Infertile Couples a Target for Sexual Predators

Image result for Infertile Couples

 

China, May 14, 2015 – Beijing Today

 

For Chinese couples who are struggling to conceive, the legal options for achieving pregnancy can be difficult and costly to pursue.

 

Searches for keywords like “infertility” or “sperm donor” on any search engine yield hundreds of pages promising information on sperm donation. Many display the donors’ physical information and a photograph.

 

But on the Internet, little is ever as simple it appears.

 

A reporter for the Yangcheng Evening News joined one of the QQ Groups for infertility and posed as a woman seeking a sperm donor. More than 10 volunteers offered to provide their sperm without pay – but only if they were allowed to “donate it directly.”

 

One of the hopeful donors, a graduate of a Project 211 university in Shanghai, sent his diploma to the reporter. He continued messaging her every hour to ask when she was coming to Shanghai to “receive his donation” and offered to pay for the trip.

 

Another respondent identified himself as the CEO of a Tianjin-based investment company. He told the reporter that he had a two-year-old son and that he had also helped one of his friends have twins by directly having sex with the man’s wife. When the reporter, the man began sending semi-nude photos of himself and saying that his “success rate was high.”

 

Eight of the 10 group members the reporter spoke with tried to convince her to have sex with them.

 

One 24-year-old from Hebei province went further and asked the reporter to pay him 50,000 yuan for sex.

 

A college student in Beijing was one of the only respondents who did not demand sex. He said he could provide sperm to the reporter’s hospital for 2,000 yuan and would continue to offer samples until she was pregnant.

The Family Planning Hospital of Guangdong Province estimates that 10 percent of China’s married couples have problems with achieving pregnancy.

The Yangcheng Evening News said China has 19 sperm banks. However, China’s assisted fertility options are complicated and bogged down with paperwork. Many couples must go through two or more years before they are allowed to try artificial insemination.

 

Artificial insemination costs 6,000 to 8,000 yuan per attempt, and many couples spend 100,000 yuan or more before a successful pregnancy.